Y'all are a bunch of wankers!

I had a project stolen right from under me

The boss and I met last week to discuss a project that was proposed to him by another department.  I told him what was on my plate.  He let the director of that department know that I have a few things going on but should be able to fit it in. 

The director of that department then asked in an email how many hours it would take.  The boss wanted me to reply so I followed up and wrote that I needed more information.  It involves re-writing an old application and I did not know what functions they wanted to keep.  I should have met with the stakeholders to begin with (as I've almost always done in the past) but was not invited to this meeting. 

The department director then stated what functions they wanted, but it was not a final list, so I still did not have all of the information that I needed.  I sent the director of that department a link so she could look into further.

A couple days later, I was logged into SQL and noticed that our other developer had already started working on it.  I don't know what kind of communication took place or what happened but he's working on it now.

Maybe the boss figured I was tied up with other shit and didn't want to overload me...although I could still have started working on it next week.  Or maybe he was just being a dick because he knows that I prefer software development over support stuff.  It might be his way of passive aggressively retaliating for pushing back on the scheduling thing.  Who knows. 

Should I say anything to anyone or just let it go?
Permalink dot 
February 8th, 2018 12:45am
Should have said "two months" right off the bat. You appear difficult, complaining, uncertain of yourself.

By the time you're still dicking around with specs and meetings the other guy has already written two months of hands on stuff, as he promised. Sure, it'll be revealed he needs another 6 to finsh (another lie) but now he's already foot in the door while you got nothing.
Permalink Io 
February 8th, 2018 12:59am
> Should have said "two months" right off the bat. You appear difficult, complaining, uncertain of yourself.

That was not my intent, I just wanted to give them an accurate number.  Plus my head was spinning from the other stuff going on.

I should have said "next month sometime" and left it at that.  It's hard to tell whether it will take two weeks or two months because I don't know how many hours I have to work on software development on a day to day basis since my day is full of interruptions.  Some days, I get to spend most of my shift on it, some days, very little.

> By the time you're still dicking around with specs and meetings the other guy has already written two months of hands on stuff, as he promised. Sure, it'll be revealed he needs another 6 to finsh (another lie) but now he's already foot in the door while you got nothing.

I wasn't invited to any meetings.  Normally I deal with the stakeholders directly.  My boss told me right off the bat that his boss should have scheduled me to join them at the meeting...but instead I got a half-assed rundown of the meeting from the boss and didn't have all of the information I needed.

For awhile there, I was handling the SDLC on projects from start to finish until these newbie managers took over and started getting involved.  Neither one of them knows jack about the software development process.
Permalink dot 
February 8th, 2018 1:25am
You might have just saved yourself a lot of headaches.  I've taken on projects that turned out to be nightmare that have sort of started this way.  You might be better off.
Permalink Almost Anonymous 
February 8th, 2018 1:41am
> You might have just saved yourself a lot of headaches.  I've taken on projects that turned out to be nightmare that have sort of started this way.  You might be better off.

Maybe so but it's not an overly complicated project.  It is boy wonder's biggest project yet, however.  If there is any adversity, it should be interesting to see how he reacts to it. 

He's a nice guy but reminds me of myself when I first started.  He is getting all kinds of accolades, praise, etc, going all out to prove himself, but is being taken advantage of.
Permalink dot 
February 8th, 2018 2:09am
When they asked the other guy for an estimate he probably told them a week or two - ‘cos nothing can take much longer, right?

Sit back and watch (with popcorn).
Permalink Zaq 
February 8th, 2018 2:28am
You use of the word 'stolen' seems just another indication of how childish you are.
Permalink So you know 
February 8th, 2018 7:06am
> When they asked the other guy for an estimate he probably told them a week or two - ‘cos nothing can take much longer, right?

I have no idea but it would not surprise me.  I can see him burning himself out over time.

He did get a slap on the wrist last week because he agreed to work on a project for a different department and it never went through our management.  We have something called a "request system" that nobody seems to pay attention to.  I would look like an asshole if I brought it up, eh?  Or bring up the fast that we used to have monthly meetings to go over all software projects, set priorities, etc.  I don't want to come across as if I'm sandbagging him so perhaps I should just keep my mouth shut.
Permalink dot 
February 8th, 2018 8:58am
You could email your manager requesting clarification, list what you thought the procedure was, ask if it has changed, ask what the reasoning is.
Permalink Plm 
February 8th, 2018 9:01am
"So You Know", kindly go fuck yourself.  Is that childish enough for you?
Permalink dot 
February 8th, 2018 9:02am
The other guy is a go getter and problem solver who gets things done. I'd give him a raise next evaluation as his manager.

OP though. Complains a lot. Little follow through. Passive aggressive. Doesn't get things done. We're thinking of laying him off.
Permalink Reality Check 
February 8th, 2018 9:18am
You need to confirm that you are no longer assigned to the project. Otherwise you will be held accountable for that project.

Why do you care if management assigned someone else if you have enough to do?  If that project appealed to you, you should have shown excitement about working on it.
Permalink Legion 
February 8th, 2018 9:25am
>> When they asked the other guy for an estimate he probably told them a week or two - ‘cos nothing can take much longer, right?

If he's smart he gave an estimate known as "the point of no return". A week or two is a clueless geek's choice attempt at winning office politics. That's something which will indeed put you ahead another clueless geek who spent that week or two whining and asking annoying questions.

But management can always ditch a week or two of work. It's below noise level for them. Come up with a couple of months, make them like at least 6 and you got a strong foot in the door.

Ditching the crap would make them look bad twice. Once for being fucking imbeciles and giving the incompetent guy the project. And secondly because from their and their superior's perspective there's no way to discern between competent and incompetent. So if you throw away the work so far, with 100% certainty you'll get exactly the same crap on the next attempt. With an additional 6 months delay.

So that's why this is known as the point of no return. If you got here, you'll be promoted and be poured additional resources to help with the great project that you started.
Permalink Io 
February 8th, 2018 9:27am
> You could email your manager requesting clarification, list what you thought the procedure was, ask if it has changed, ask what the reasoning is.

There's a team meeting coming up.  Maybe bring it up there?

We used to have a procedure that worked pretty well.  Someone would submit a request, we'd schedule a meeting involving our management, we'd have a monthly meeting to sort out priorities and decide who's doing what, and it worked pretty well. 

I'm guilty of doing shit for people without going through management as well.  For quite awhile, we had a management vacuum and I was managing my own projects and did everything.  Managers would sometimes go directly to me (rather than my bosses) and now they're doing the same with this other guy.  The new management team is slowly getting more involved in the project management.

I have some ideas to streamline things but I don't want to act like I'm two pay grades above myself and start pissing people off.  However, I see problems down the line if we don't get a process put in place.

There's not only the burnout factor but this guy could leave and then I'll have to support all of his stuff, or vice versa.
Permalink dot 
February 8th, 2018 9:33am
> The other guy is a go getter and problem solver who gets things done. I'd give him a raise next evaluation as his manager.

I used to be this guy.  Still am but I was in the middle of two big roll outs and can only do so much multitasking.  If it were a slow week, I would have been all over it.

> OP though. Complains a lot. Little follow through. Passive aggressive. Doesn't get things done.

I could very well be coming across this way.  I don't think management realizes what's on my plate and I do plenty of work that I don't get credit for.
Permalink dot 
February 8th, 2018 9:37am
> You need to confirm that you are no longer assigned to the project. Otherwise you will be held accountable for that project.

Good point.  I can see a situation a few weeks down the line when someone asks me where I'm at on the project as if I'm holding it up.  I have been in situations in the past where I get blamed for someone else's mistakes on a team project.  Definitely want to avoid that.

I will have to play stupid and act like I don't know that the other guy is working on the project. 

> Why do you care if management assigned someone else if you have enough to do?  If that project appealed to you, you should have shown excitement about working on it.

I'm just a little irked that nobody approached me and said that either I'm no longer on the project or he is now on the project. 

I would have jumped on it if I didn't have other projects.  Another week or two and I would have been good but perhaps they are in a rush.
Permalink dot 
February 8th, 2018 9:58am
Send a clarifying email to your boss asking why you have not been assigned to this project.

Don't wait.

Do it now.
Permalink Paris Hilton 
February 8th, 2018 10:07am
> If he's smart he gave an estimate known as "the point of no return". A week or two is a clueless geek's choice attempt at winning office politics. That's something which will indeed put you ahead another clueless geek who spent that week or two whining and asking annoying questions.

I'm not sure what he told them.  This guy is still relatively new and trying to impress people.  He says yes to everything and never pushes back.  I used to be that guy.  My boss at the time noticed this and it got to the point where I remember him telling me that I'm "too easy" and other co-workers resented me for raising the bar.  I see this guy falling into the same trap.

I have had to learn how to pace myself over time to try and avoid getting burned out, even though I still do get burned out on occasion. 

There's a thin line between being seen as a "go getter" and "difficult".  I will admit that I have not mastered the political game to manage others' perceptions. 

Bored Bystander called me out for being a pussy but the entire department is like this, from the Director on down.  The director never says no to anyone and just about everyone lets themselves get walked on by the business.  You push back and you stand out and not in a good way.

> Ditching the crap would make them look bad twice. Once for being fucking imbeciles and giving the incompetent guy the project. And secondly because from their and their superior's perspective there's no way to discern between competent and incompetent. So if you throw away the work so far, with 100% certainty you'll get exactly the same crap on the next attempt. With an additional 6 months delay.

I have witnessed this phenomenon in the past.

> So that's why this is known as the point of no return. If you got here, you'll be promoted and be poured additional resources to help with the great project that you started.

It's not a huge project where one would be promoted or given additional resources but I see what you mean.
Permalink dot 
February 8th, 2018 10:25am
Paris, I was assigned to the project.  Now apparently I'm off. 

I'm not yet in the office.  We do have a team meeting later and it's going to be awkward when this guy starts talking about the work he's done on this project and I'm sitting there looking like an idiot.
Permalink dot 
February 8th, 2018 10:38am
I'm sorry for boring you guys with all of these details.

I guess what I'm trying to get at is this:

We're developing software in a busy IT department.  Even though software development is only part of our responsibilities, we need to be run more like a software development shop.  We need better version control, we need more documentation, we need a software development process, we need change management process, we need to make sure we're getting credit for our work, we need to make sure what we're organized and have some sort of standards.

This players in this game are the other developer, myself, and our two bosses (one whom is clueless about software development and his boss who is clueless about software AND anything IT).

What it boils down to is this:

Should I raise myself a couple of pay grades above my current position, express my concerns, and tell these guys we're headed in the wrong direction and need to improve our process?  Or just keep my head down, deal with the bullshit, focus on finding something else, and let someone else clean up the mess (which I would surely be blamed for if I were to leave)?
Permalink dot 
February 8th, 2018 10:52am
Hey dot,

We’ve already well established that you’re a clueless, ball-less, passive-aggressive beta-male geek.

Countless times you’ve solicited our advice and then studiously ignored it.

By this time everyone at your place of work will know this as well.

Any embarrassment you feel is entirely in your own head, nobody else there is going to give a fuck.

Neither do we.

Do whatever you like.
Permalink Plm’s Bot 
February 8th, 2018 11:02am
> We’ve already well established that you’re a clueless, ball-less, passive-aggressive beta-male geek.

Says a sock puppet who posts under a different user name.

> Countless times you’ve solicited our advice and then studiously ignored it.

What brilliant advice did you give?
Permalink dot 
February 8th, 2018 11:05am
>Says a sock puppet who posts under a different user name.

Duh, obviously, it’s kinda in the name.


>What brilliant advice did you give?

I’ve made no claims to providing advice.


I will however attempt to summarise the advice from others:

1) Man up, you fucking pussy, stop being such a cuck.

2) Get stuff in writing to avoid ambiguity.

3) Change your fucking job, they’re obviously clueless.


I’m sure there are many more, but you’ve been posting this shit for years, I lose track.

All other contributors to my list are welcome...
Permalink Plm’s Bot 
February 8th, 2018 11:51am
I am guessing you are either Bored Bystander or Reality Check.

> stop being such a cuck.

Each situation is different!  I post specifics and often get generalities in return.

I'm looking to have a back and forth discussion, you prefer name calling.  You don't bother to share your experiences.  You never dealt with the same kind of shit?

> Get stuff in writing to avoid ambiguity.

We had things in writing and then things changed as stated.

> Change your fucking job, they’re obviously clueless.

Didn't I say I was working on that?  It doesn't happen overnight.
Permalink dot 
February 9th, 2018 10:11am

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