Give ne back my hat!

Software idea

My two year trade restraint ends in a week's time. It's got me thinking about whether it would be worth writing software to compete with my old employer.

It's not very complex software and the domain is ultra boring but it could probably gain traction and definitely has a market.

Searching the web, I see a small successful startup doing exactly the same thing in Europe.

There's nothing clever about it, nor about my idea to compete with it, but I have good domain knowledge and could probably get something going under a year.

Any thoughts?
Permalink Bluebeard 
December 6th, 2017 2:45pm
Is this question NP-Complete or NP-Hard?
Permalink BibimbapClinton 
December 6th, 2017 2:49pm
They'll sue if you have any success,and maybe if you  don't.


The allegation will be you stole some trade secrets and/or even some source code.
Permalink MobyDobie 
December 6th, 2017 2:56pm
The major question here seems: can you sell it?
Permalink Lotti Fuehrscheim 
December 6th, 2017 2:57pm
Where there's muck, there's brass.
Permalink Bill 
December 6th, 2017 2:59pm
I agree with Moby thinking. What you need to do is to pass that info to another person like me for example. Then you will be nth degree from Kevin Bacon. In this case, Kevin Bacon is me.
Permalink BibimbapClinton 
December 6th, 2017 2:59pm
Actually  my next question is: are you prepared to spend a year or two with lawyers even if you've done nothing wrong.

If the answer is no, then you shouldn't start the project.
Permalink MobyDobie 
December 6th, 2017 3:04pm
No one would think Kevin Bacon does software.
Permalink BibimbapClinton 
December 6th, 2017 3:05pm
...but Bacon's sister Mavis does typing!




Badum Tish
Permalink Zaq 
December 6th, 2017 3:06pm
But Mavis doesn't do spelling. Zaq took spelling lesson from her...:-)
Permalink BibimbapClinton 
December 6th, 2017 3:13pm
Nobody here knows shit about South African IP law so all you are totally unqualified to answer whether there's a possible issue that would come up.

In the US when sued you'd have to prove you did a clean room reimplementation of anything you copy. That means if you wrote the code before, you write a spec and hand it to a guy who writes the code. That guy doesn't talk to you about implementation details.

But the US is really hard ass about IP shit. Maybe in South Africa none of this is any big deal.

As far as should you do it I say YES! Why not.
Permalink Reality Check 
December 6th, 2017 3:54pm
It's not about law.

He can be totally I  the right, but if arse holes sue then he still has to spend time fighting.

The purpose of the lawsuit isn't to necessarily win, but to cripple a competitor before it gets started.
Permalink MobyDobie 
December 6th, 2017 3:58pm
Go for it. How much do you think you can bill a user for? How many users do you think you can get? Can you sell worldwide?
Permalink Q 
December 6th, 2017 3:58pm
Maybe consider implementation in a different language in order to have it harder to prove that you stole their code?
Permalink Zaq 
December 6th, 2017 4:11pm
Sales sales sales sales sales sales sales sales sales sales sales sales sales sales sales sales sales sales sales.

And marketing.

But mainly  sales sales sales sales sales sales sales sales sales.

IMNSHO, the main barrier to B2B software package sales success is finding customers.

If it's a small niche you'll have a bullseye painted on you with respect to your old employer.
Permalink Bored Bystander 
December 6th, 2017 5:26pm
"In the US when sued you'd have to prove you did a clean room reimplementation of anything you copy. That means if you wrote the code before, you write a spec and hand it to a guy who writes the code."

The easiest proof of that would be me writing it in a different language, different platform and to a different market.

The workflow of the software would be very similar because across the board the industry works the same way.
Permalink Bluebeard 
December 6th, 2017 8:56pm
And yes to sales sales sales BB! There's no way I could do this on my own, I'd need a sales animal to drive it.
Permalink Bluebeard 
December 6th, 2017 8:57pm
I'm amazed anything gets done in the US, you are all so afraid of getting sued.
Permalink libtard_uk 
December 7th, 2017 2:15am
Academic studies have shown that there's a certain amount of law and number of lawyers that are a net positive to the economy.  Below or beyond that is a net drag on the economy (unlikely to be linear or symettrical in both directs).

The US is way past the ideal point.

The UK is at or recently past the ideal point.

(obviously there is some uncertainty with these kinds of measurements)
Permalink MobyDobie 
December 7th, 2017 5:04am

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