Give ne back my hat!

What do you collect / hoard?

The 40 year retirement thread brought up collecting and hoarding things.

What do you all here collect?

I used to collect all sorts of things, but after I came home from college, I tossed nearly all of my childhood things. It took a whole summer. My parents wanted to move to a smaller place and they needed me to deal with my junk so I did.

Since then I've built up certain things. But I try to limit it to specific categories and not allow myself to get things outside those categories.

Current categories are as follows:

- books on history and music
- acoustic musical instruments
- lego sets

After the kids lost interest in lego as they got older, I started to get some of the more extravagant sets for myself, so I have a collection. As my kids age out of the system here, they can take their legos with them, donate them to friends, charity, or me. But not store them.

School books we have tons but not enough room. The lower grades I don't have any kids in that range now so those books got passed along to other local homeschoolers. I used to have a lot more books but pared it down to two key categories of things that I have a lot of references on, some that are hard to find.

The instruments we use as part of music classes and a small band. When the kids age out they'll take their favorites with them, donate away, or leave them here if they prefer, just like with the legos.

Tons of other junk like christmas ornaments, extensive fashion clothing, jewelry, and so forth I have tossed out.
Permalink Homeschooling Mom 
November 7th, 2017 2:45pm
Another way to dispose of things is selling them of course.

The oldest one when he left for college sold some of his rare classic lego sets, which he'd kept the boxes for, on ebay for a lot of cash, much more than they cost originally. He had some of the bigger old star wars sets and the early modulars, all which dramatically increased in price over the years. He then bought a new car with cash using lego proceeds.
Permalink Homeschooling Mom 
November 7th, 2017 2:47pm
Computers.  Hardware, Software, Manuals.

All the stuff I wanted to have in 1977, that didn't exist, or didn't exist affordably.

A 2 KByte S-100 based CP/M system with floppy disk and separate VT-100 Terminal was $5,000 in 1977.  You could buy a Honda Civic 1200 for $3,000 in 1977.  I couldn't afford BOTH the Civic and the computer at the time.
Permalink SaveTheHubble 
November 7th, 2017 2:49pm
Hubble, please don't recreate memory of your youth by buying stuffs that you can't afford in 1977.

This is what everyone should only have:

1. A recent modern laptop.
2. A car.
3. An investment/saving account.
4. A Roomba
5. A dog/cat
6. A male/female (depending on your preference) significant other.
7. Everything else must go (that includes children).
Permalink brah! 
November 7th, 2017 3:04pm
That is very interesting about death cleaning.

Details vary by tribe, but a common north american tribal death practice is to burn all the possessions of the deceased. If he owned horses, the horses are killed.

When the person knows they are sick sometimes they will have a big giveaway where they give away their property.

The idea in general though is that the concept of inheritance of property leads to problems, so the best solution to maintain harmony is to destroy everything.
Permalink Whitefeather 
November 7th, 2017 3:45pm
Also, for many tribes, one or more of the wives may honor their husband by throwing herself onto his funeral pyre.

For those who do not wish to do so, that is respected too. These women often would cut off one of their fingers, in solidarity with the loss of their husband. It is a beautiful practice. A small number of native women still practice this today. But it is a very small number, no more than a handful.
Permalink Whitefeather 
November 7th, 2017 3:46pm
What if a woman who lost both arms in an accident, she doesn't have any finger to cut off?
Permalink brah! 
November 7th, 2017 3:49pm
I'm eying your feather cap, whiteFeather!
Permalink brah! 
November 7th, 2017 3:50pm
I am not aware of any such case in the history of north american tribes. However, I do not know the histories of all people in all tribes. Can you point to some information about the armless case you mean?

In general that would be handled by the person at the time. In most tribes such matters are ultimately up to the individual.

A person born armless would likely be considered to be marked as special by the spirits and thus somewhat holy. Most likely they would be encouraged to follow a path such as that of a medicine person.

I am aware of cases where people had their heads cut off, but they did not survive past that. Losing limbs and surviving long term was very rare, I can't think of any cases.
Permalink Whitefeather 
November 7th, 2017 4:00pm
Warriors with severe injuries like that would generally tell the others to bury him if possible or leave him behind if enemies were in pursuit. Then he would become food for the coyotes. People preferred burial or burning, depending on their tradition, to being eaten, but being eaten was understandable. It generally though meant you had no people to handle your body, which was not good. Being eaten by the animal was neutral and understandable. The problem was with being abandoned, unless necessary. Many people died alone though.

People generally did not like to become burdens. If your health and mind were such that you could not contribute anything useful, it would be time for you to go into the woods and lay by a tree until you died, or something came and ate you.
Permalink Whitefeather 
November 7th, 2017 4:04pm
brah, you refer to a person living in current times, who is not an Indian at all but is a Bharatiya.
Permalink Whitefeather 
November 7th, 2017 4:05pm
> Losing limbs and surviving long term was very rare, I can't think of any cases.

It was pretty common in post-mediaeval Europe.

The Dutch navy had a comprehensive list of pensions for the loss of various body parts.

A competent amputation during battle had a 50% chance of survival.

Loss of a leg would give enough money to buy a bar, for example, to provide a living.

It was one of the reasons that they attracted very capable sailors that would beat much larger numbers of Englishmen or French, who were generally forced into service.
Permalink Lotti Fuehrscheim 
November 7th, 2017 4:06pm
And death would give an even higher pension to the widow, so there was strong motivation to have competent doctors in battle.
Permalink Lotti Fuehrscheim 
November 7th, 2017 4:07pm
Whitefeather, my bad...

https://arynews.tv/en/armless-girl-flies-plane-with-her-feet-and-is-a-black-belt-in-tae-kwon-do/

She is a native of Arizona. I don't know what tribe she belongs to.
Permalink brah! 
November 7th, 2017 4:13pm
I met Jessica a few years ago. Nice lady. She has a genetic variance and was born without arms. In most North American tribes she'd be raised specially, often to be a medicine woman.

She does look indian, but it's because she's half Filipina.

However, Spain did conquer the Philippines from the east, so under the Spanish understanding and the Papal Bull splitting the world, Filipinos technically were Indians. And this probably legally continued after the Spanish American War, though it was never handled in the courts. Unlike Puebloans who had to go to court to determine if they were Indians after the US took over their territory from Mexico.

Their traditions though may be different from those of north american indians.

Since the Philippines declared its independence many decades ago though they are not part of the US or Spain, not under jurisdiction of Papal Bulls and presumably are their own people and no longer legally indian.
Permalink Whitefeather 
November 7th, 2017 5:02pm
I've seen illustrations showing that the Mexica did cut off people's arms. You can see the blood spurting out. The Mexica had a terrifying hybrid axe, club and sword made from razor sharp obsidian. It was actually able to split open the metal breastplates of the Spaniards.

If you got hit with it you didn't survive.

Someone mentioned big ships. Yes, limb losing incidences were common during the European Age of Exploration. There are lots of ways to have your arm torn off in the rigging.

Indians had boats, and sailboats as well. The rigging was not as complex. The largest boats though, in the Caribbean, were fairly complex, comparable to Viking longships. Some held over 100 passengers and could carry many tons of cargo.
Permalink Whitefeather 
November 7th, 2017 5:06pm
> The largest boats though, in the Caribbean, were fairly complex, comparable to Viking longships.

Not true.

They lacked iron technology for that.

Vikings only developed their longships after Mediterranean technology had filtered through to them through the Frisians ( = Angles).

Before that, North Sea Germanic ships were canoe and peddle based, like in the Caribbean.
Permalink Lotti Fuehrscheim 
November 7th, 2017 5:15pm
And obsidian weapons would usually shatter on the Spanish armour.

That is why such a small force of Spaniards could fight the Aztecs and win.

Obsisian is very good at cleaving through unprotected meat, not so through steel plate.
Permalink Lotti Fuehrscheim 
November 7th, 2017 5:32pm
There were sailing canoes in the Caribbean, to be clear.

But the general winds there were not very favourable to develop advanced sailing vessels.

Viking ships were very advanced sailing vessels, with a very sturdy hull thanks to large iron nails that allowed planks to fit both strongly and flexibly.
Permalink Lotti Fuehrscheim 
November 7th, 2017 5:40pm
>> Hubble, please don't recreate memory of your youth by buying stuffs that you can't afford in 1977.

Well, I do that too. 4 ZX Spectrums, one Nintendo NES and a Sega Megadrive. Looking after another ZX Spectrum which sells at a whopping $1000 today :P
Permalink Io 
November 8th, 2017 8:07am
>> SaveTheHubble: A 2 KByte S-100 based CP/M system with floppy disk and separate VT-100 Terminal was $5,000 in 1977.  You could buy a Honda Civic 1200 for $3,000 in 1977.  I couldn't afford BOTH the Civic and the computer at the time.

What I'm looking after is a 64 KByte BASIC + optionally CP/M system, with floppy disk. There's an option for a monitor but that was not that much of a problem, I could substitute it with a TV, albeit it probably destroyed my eyesight since I started wearing glasses after high school. And it may not have been the TV since I changed 3, but the poorly designed RF interface, coze the darn image kept trembling.

Anywayza, not the TV but the floppy was my problem. A random-access media that saves/loads stuff in seconds, 2-10 as I've seen on the HC-2000 which was probably the longest surviving market-rugged Neanderthal, manufactured, sold and profitable in 1996. Instead of 5-10 minutes of a cassette. If you have a cassette. Most of the times I didn't even have a cassette.

Fuckers, if bomb or famine or general trouble strikes, and you're (we're) out of touch with human knowledge for several years, I invite you to rebuild just the things we had back than. These stupids who touch a rock and dial a number are not engineers, they're stupid. To make a telegraph (wired) connection requires knowledge that 99.98% of humanity doesn't have. Make it to wireless, 99.99%. Make it to other planets or next life.

Zero.
Permalink Io 
November 8th, 2017 2:22pm

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