Give ne back my hat!

No water coming out of outside faucet

I was going to wash my car the other day, turned on the water, and there was no water. 

I took the faucet apart and still dry.

Does this mean there is a blockage in the line somewhere?  If so, is there a way to clear the blockage without having to replace part of the line?

This is the only faucet I am having trouble with (and no, there is no shut off valve)
Permalink Mike 
October 10th, 2017 11:07am
"there is no shut off valve"

What do you mean by that? You have a mains shut off somewhere, are you saying you don't know where it is?

Based on your comment "there is no shut off valve", I recommend you call a plumber because you don't know what you are doing and you're on the verge of this awesome scene:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OP30okjpCko

In that case the unlicensed plumber felt like he didn't need to find the mains shut off.

No one competent would even be toying with such a notion.
Permalink Reality Check 
October 10th, 2017 11:11am
OK, Michael B. You haven't debugged all problems with the house you bought? You may want to exercise every path of this house through devices to see if anything is not working.
Permalink Done That 
October 10th, 2017 11:12am
Also notice the delicious detail that the unlicensed Mexican plumber brought his undocumented Mexican wife and their water vacuum to a simply plumbing gig.

Obviously he brought this vacuum and his wife to operate it ... because this is how he plumbs.
Permalink Reality Check 
October 10th, 2017 11:12am
Are you saying Michael B hired illegal immigrants to work on his house?
Permalink Done That 
October 10th, 2017 11:15am
Later today at Mike's house...

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YJTqg5NlHFI
Permalink Reality Check 
October 10th, 2017 11:17am
@Done That, I'm saying he needs to hire someone who is licensed and insured because as soon as someone starts acting like they don't need to shut the water off before working on plumbing, they have the above videos to look forward to.
Permalink Reality Check 
October 10th, 2017 11:20am
I thought you just need to watch YouTube for DIY.
Permalink Done That 
October 10th, 2017 11:21am
How is it possible to have a house without the main shutoff valve?
Permalink Done That 
October 10th, 2017 11:23am
What do you do when you need to overhaul the plumbing system?
Permalink Done That 
October 10th, 2017 11:23am
Maybe the shutoff valve is at house #1 on the block! All other houses after #1 have none. lol
Permalink Done That 
October 10th, 2017 11:25am
I'm not talking about the MAIN shut off valve.  Of course there is one.  I'm talking about a shut off valve near the outside faucet.
Permalink Mike 
October 10th, 2017 11:39am
It would be fairly unusual to see that unless it was a secondary main shut off for the whole house.
Permalink Reality Check 
October 10th, 2017 11:45am
I thought it was common in houses in cooler climate so that the faucet/line doesn't freeze over when it gets cold.
Permalink Mike 
October 10th, 2017 11:49am
Yeah, there should be a valve inside the line that lead to the outside end valve. However, you only need that if the pipe that lead to outside valve is in the basement where it is cold. If it runs through a warm room, you don't need the secondary shutoff valve.
Permalink Done That 
October 10th, 2017 11:55am
I live in a condo where there are two levels. On the first floor I have a secondary shutoff valve for outside valve since it is the laundry room without heater (only an on-demand electric heater). My second floor has an outside valve with no secondary shutoff valve since the pipe is about 8 feet above ground and inside the condo where it is always warm.
Permalink Done That 
October 10th, 2017 11:58am
It is in a crawlspace.

So something must be clogging up the line, eh?
Permalink Mike 
October 10th, 2017 12:00pm
"I thought it was common in houses in cooler climate so that the faucet/line doesn't freeze over when it gets cold."

If it was done correctly, it used a valve designed for that situation. This has the faucet handle on the outside, going into a long metal tube the back end of which is the actual valve, fully inside the house. All faucets in climates where it freezes are supposed to be like this.

If yours is not then it should be upgraded.
Permalink Reality Check 
October 10th, 2017 12:01pm
Just use a compressor and blow it out. Wow, this is lot of work. You need to disconnect the pipes.
Permalink Done That 
October 10th, 2017 12:04pm
Or the inside valve isn't open...
Permalink Done That 
October 10th, 2017 12:06pm
If he does have a frost proof valve then the interior valve can be stuck, broken, or have gunk clogging it up. However presumably he would have noticed it was a frost proof valve when he removed and disassembled it.
Permalink Reality Check 
October 10th, 2017 12:09pm
I'm betting there IS an inside shut-off valve, but he doesn't know where it is or what it looks like.

Some of them are just a lever-looking thing on top of the pipe -- 1/4 turn from off to on.

And if the outside valve comes out of a crawl-space, it's possible the shut-off valve is quite far away from the outside valve.  Trace the cold-water line back.

It's even possible the shut-off is IN the crawl-space, but that would be annoying.
Permalink SaveTheHubble 
October 10th, 2017 3:09pm
Will that be high crawl or low crawl technique that he must use? I bet they didn't teach you that in Naval basic training, Hubble?
Permalink Done That 
October 10th, 2017 3:14pm
Nope.  That's Army or Marines.
Permalink SaveTheHubble 
October 10th, 2017 3:16pm
I think he said this house was built around 1930 or so. Who knows what building codes were in play back then. And since then perhaps 2, 4, or even a dozen owners. Maybe some of them replumbed everything according to their own whims. Or maybe, even worse, absolutely nothing has been done at all!

I have shut off valves in my crawlspace because I put them there. I also have shut off valves under cabinets, outside, inside, everywhere.

Yet it seems like no matter what happens the only reasonable action is to turn off the mains for a few hours.
Permalink Reality Check 
October 10th, 2017 3:17pm
"Mains" is so British! I like it.

Around here we say "main".
Permalink Legion 
October 10th, 2017 7:00pm
> I'm betting there IS an inside shut-off valve, but he doesn't know where it is or what it looks like.

I looked and there is not.
Permalink Mike 
October 11th, 2017 11:56am
Wow, I hope to God you don't live in Flint Michigan, home of lead-laden water.
Permalink Brice Richard 
October 11th, 2017 12:14pm
> I looked and there is not.

Mine was behind the rear panel of one of the kitchen units.  You couldn't actually get to it without cutting a hole in the back of one of the kitchen cupboards.

Really.

If the previous owner hadn't done it, I never would have known it was there.
Permalink MobyDobie 
October 12th, 2017 6:07am
> Really

Kitchens and bathrooms change relatively fast.

Maybe that location was caused by a renovation decision.

The cabinets moved, but the valve did not.
Permalink X 
October 12th, 2017 9:12am
In most UK houses the rising main isolation valve is either in the cupboard under the kitchen sink or on the wall behind the downstairs toilet.
Permalink Qaz 
October 12th, 2017 4:15pm

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