Anything else just isn't Enterprise enough.

I just got "promoted" to Enterprise Data Architect

I don't even know what that means. I can understand defining the architecture for an application or a BI system. But for the whole enterprise? How does that work? Anyone here else ever hold this position?
Permalink Shiny New Kid 
September 9th, 2017 2:29am
I met an old school mate at a reunion who holds such a position at the Dutch tax office, and we had a team at my work with that function.

It doesn't have to imply hollow words and bullshit, but a well designed integral data plan for a company can be very useful in the long run.

Their function is to prevent individual projects to just optimise for their own tasks, but rather take the complete data flow and need throughout the company as their perspective.

I always had a good relationship with those people at my work, and their principles have helped us very much during the big mainframe migration project, because all the system interfaces were well designed and systematic.
Permalink Lotti Fuehscheim 
September 9th, 2017 3:56am
Sure, I get it if you have a major migration project. But if you have a CRM system and then a smattering of proprietary vendor packages along with semi-proprietary crap like biztalk .. I mean what are you supposed to be doing?

Yeah maybe there's a team of people working on a web app and there's some consulting firm building out a data warehouse.

I don't see what I can do besides document some principles and hope people adhere to them. I definitely have no idea what I'm supposed to sink my teeth into..
Permalink Shiny New Kid 
September 9th, 2017 4:56am
For biztalk/SOA you will have to govern the data catalog for consumption.
Permalink Lee 
September 9th, 2017 6:35am
> well designed integral data plan for a company

What does that look like?
Message contents? Database schema?
Permalink X 
September 9th, 2017 9:39am
> well designed integral data plan for a company

What does that look like?
Message contents? Database schema?
Permalink X 
September 9th, 2017 9:39am
> > well designed integral data plan for a company
>
> What does that look like?
> Message contents? Database schema?

All of them, and everything both in a physical implementation and a platform independent abstraction layer.

Their data-schemes and messages have survived various implementations, from indexed files in the 1980's through mainframe relational in the 1990's and early 2000's to MS-SQL, and from a ESR-like message code to XML-schemata and webservices, but with the same logic.
Permalink Lotti Fuehscheim 
September 9th, 2017 10:40am
>I don't even know what that means.

Your post reads like a text book example of how the "Peter Principle" works.

No offense, but it seems to me that you are currently not ready/qualified for this particular position with the company that you work for UNLESS this is a role/position that never existed before within the company that you work for.

If this is the situation then you and your boss will need to sit down and define what role you will be playing (i.e. come up with a detailed job description).
Permalink One Programmer's Opinion 
September 9th, 2017 4:51pm
That's pretty much what I've been doing for the past 10 years or so. It's a real thing. If "Enterprise" is a real thing, they're asking you to create and maintain The One Data Architecture To Rule Them All.

If this is a serious thread I'd be happy to answer what I can.
Permalink Shylock 
September 9th, 2017 9:12pm
Great, I got promoted because I am and have been good at designing and implementing data architectures for individual projects. This part I can understand.

But being the Enterprise architectures seems to imply that I can do the same for some enterprise wide data vision. That part I don't get.

An enterprise infrastructure architect can design the corporate network because it underlies all business areas of the company. A solutions architect can set down some standards around continuous builds, testing etc. Which can apply to all development projects.

But the data architecture does not have this global scope. Every data model is individually tailored to support the requirements of an individual project. Yes, I can say that certain naming conventions need to exist and stuff like that. But unless I become intimately involved in the requirements of every project, it would be wrong to direct the data model on each one.

There are data flows between packaged apps and BizTalk, but those are somewhat self contained.

I guess this idea of one data model to rule them all, would make sense if all the apps were going to get rebuilt from scratch. But otherwise .. how do I apply this in a company that pretty much has already built or bought most of their apps?
Permalink Shiny New Kid 
September 10th, 2017 3:52am
I get suspicious of these titles. Oftentimes these are silver bullet titles such that you wind up being responsible for fixing the problems caused by years of shitty architecture. Now you're miracle guy with the magic title that's going to make everything right.
Permalink Home Despot 
September 10th, 2017 5:16am
>But unless I become intimately involved in the requirements of every project, it would be wrong to direct the data model on each one.

This is it. Especially if you're going to create a corporate data warehouse. That's usually what the Enterprise Data Architect does.
Permalink Shylock 
September 10th, 2017 7:02am
OK. The enterprise data warehouse I can understand. That's fine. I've done many of those, and that falls well within my comfort zone.

I'm just a bit concerned, like a previous poster mentioned, that I become the default dumping ground for problems others don't want to deal with.

For example, last week, some manager sent me an email pointing to a public file directory that contains hundreds of PDF documents that contain confidential information. Somehow, as a data architect, this person thought this was my problem. I suppose this data must have come ultimately from an application database, but I wasn't sure that made it my problem to solve.
Permalink Shiny New Kid 
September 10th, 2017 9:32am
>I'm just a bit concerned, like a previous poster mentioned, that I become the default dumping ground for problems others don't want to deal with.

Yes. You will be the bearer of bad news. You will not be popular. The emotional issues are the hardest to deal with.

Good luck.
Permalink Shylock 
September 10th, 2017 10:00am
I don't get the sense that anyone really knows what the job entails - which is reassuring in a way.
Permalink Shiny New Kid 
September 10th, 2017 12:34pm
If no-one genuinely knows, look at it as an opportunity to write your own job description and sell it as the authoritative one. Do some research, ask yourself what you would like it to be, ask yourself what in good conscience it should be, and what is pragmatically realistic in your work situation. Write it, use it, and defend it with conviction.
Permalink , Cup 
September 10th, 2017 11:35pm

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