Give ne back my hat!

The English and Frisians were one and the same people.

https://www.academia.edu/33885956/Keeping_it_in_the_family_Disentangling_contact_and_inheritance_in_closely_related_languages

Linguistic research shows that Old Frisian and Old English have a common ancestor, separate from Old Saxon.

In the 4th century AD the Dutch coast got depopulated and repopulated by Angles who became new Frisians, at the same time the Anglo-Saxon culture - as defined by material culture - appears in Central England, and Schleswig in Southern Denmark gets depopulated (all based on archaeological evidence).

These new Frisians kept close trade relations with England - around 600 AD they dominate trade around the North Sea - and kept a cultural split with the Saxons on the sandy high-grounds behind the coast, although in Groningen a strong cultural (pottery) influence between Sxons and Frisians has been observed, no surprise as Groningen forms one of the few gateways through the peat fields between the coast and the inland.

There were several settlements here that were continuously inhabited from 500 BC until present where one can observe a gradual change from old Chauci style to new Anglo-Saxon style in the same households.

Chauci are documented to have lived on artificial mounds at the coast as well as on the sandy hills in the inland by Roman writers, and their name is related to the word 'high'. They also appear as sea raiders on the Flemish coast around 200 AD, ad similar raiders a century later are called Saxons by the Romans.

But more to the West there was a real discontinuity with an 'empty' phase.

DNA research also shows that Central-English, Coastal Dutch and Southern Danish populations are very similar.

The Frisian area extended towards the Flemish coast in the Early Middle Ages, but got Frankified from the South, with Holland changing its language from Frisian to Frankish (Dutch) after 1000 AD.

So the picture on the continent is pretty clear wrt this 5th century migration, but I still wonder what happened to the previous British population in Central England?
Permalink Lotti Fuehrscheim 
August 8th, 2017 1:58pm
During the late Roman rule in Britannia Germanic people were strongly encouraged by the government to immigrate. This will have started the big migration from Denmark, in a peaceful way.

I don't know why immigration was regarded desirable by the rulers at that time, but then, I don't know why migration from the South is currently regarded desirable by European rulers, but it just is.

For the area of Belgium the Romans also allowed large scale immigration of Germanic people - who would become the Franks - but there the protection of the border was a clear argument.

I can't see the people of Scotland as a similar threat, but maybe they were.
Permalink Lotti Fuehrscheim 
August 8th, 2017 2:10pm
>> I don't know why immigration was regarded desirable by the rulers at that time, but then, I don't know why migration from the South is currently regarded desirable by European rulers, but it just is.

Wtf, the population density then was extremely low compared to today. And the rulers didn't cared who worked the land as long as there was workforce to work the land, produce food and pay taxes.
Permalink Send private email Io 
August 8th, 2017 3:44pm
> Wtf, the population density then was extremely low compared to today.

But with already four centuries of Roman technology and better agricultural techniques, why didn't the native population grow faster?

When there is just arable land for the taking, what did limit population growth?

When we look at 10th century Netherlands, when the techniques to develop of peat mores became known, the population and exploited acres exploded, turning Holland from a region only inhabited along streams into a fully covered farming area in about two centuries.
Permalink Lotti Fuehrscheim 
August 8th, 2017 4:39pm
Yes, Scottish tribes were a problem (hence the Hadrian Wall).
Permalink Yoda 
August 10th, 2017 6:14pm
But the majority of immigrants didn't settle in the North, so that doesn't quite fit together.
Permalink Lotti Fuehrscheim 
August 12th, 2017 2:30pm

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