Anything else just isn't Enterprise enough.

Perfect little greenhouse

I'm thinking about getting one of these for my backyard:
http://www.perfectlittlegreenhouse.com/

I wonder how much I could actually grow? Enough to take some to the farmer's market every week?
Permalink NPR 
July 13th, 2017 8:16am
Too small for anything but growing veggies for your family.  You would need a good number of these to produce enough to sell.
Permalink ps 
July 13th, 2017 11:41am
He can grow weeds.
Permalink WildRiver 
July 13th, 2017 5:03pm
"Too small for anything but growing veggies for your family."

If that's the case, I think I might just go with something like this:
https://www.clickandgrow.com/products/wall-farm-indoor-vertical-garden

You can grow 54 plants in one of these bad boys, at 1/4 of the cost -- indoors! The only disadvantage is you have to buy their replacement capsules. At $60/mo for 2 9-packs (18) that's about half the regular cost ($20/3-pack), but it still adds up ($720/year), plus a few dollars for electricity. LED lights are very efficient.
Permalink NPR 
July 13th, 2017 8:12pm
It is 10'x12' - the size of a small bedroom. If it is the first year you have one, plan on a couple of expensive salads.

How much of your existing backyard do you currently cultivate? What sort of crops grow in your hardiness zone? Do you even know what your hardiness zone is? According to which version? The one from the 70s? or the one suppressed by the Bush administration because it showed every zone marching north?
Permalink Pie is a lot better than fine 
July 14th, 2017 8:33am
"It is 10'x12' - the size of a small bedroom. If it is the first year you have one, plan on a couple of expensive salads."

That NFT tray looks pretty big, though. I'll bet I could get a few salads every week. Lettuce can be cut and regrows, right?

"How much of your existing backyard do you currently cultivate?"

Just the porch. I have a bunch of containers with different plants.

"What sort of crops grow in your hardiness zone? Do you even know what your hardiness zone is?"

I know sort of what does well and what won't. Malabar spinach is a vining Asian green that loves this heat. Getting decent production of cherry tomatoes. Okra is working but in order to get a decent yield I'd have to plant a bunch more. I have a bunch of herbs in pots.

I've contemplated putting in raised beds in the rest of the yard. Part of it is shaded, so I'd have to try and see what works there.

Lettuce intrigues me. I know of someone in Dallas who is growing lettuce in the heat under shade. He quickly harvests the leaves before they can bolt.

I'm tired of hose-watering. I need to either setup a drip irrigation system before the heat kills my plants or go to hydroponics

Greenhouse hydroponics is interesting because it has climate control. No pests, no unpredictable weather, no watering. Plus it could be cooler than outside using the evaporative cooler so maybe could give a go at lettuce.

But I could probably get similar benefits with that indoor system I linked above at a lot less expense (at least up front).

I'll probably end up doing some combination of soil gardening outdoors and hydroponics.
Permalink NPR 
July 14th, 2017 8:45am
I looked up my hardiness zone when I started but I don't remember what it is.

I've found the local nursery carries things that are supposed to do well here. Most people I've found do some experimenting anyways, since soil, lighting and other conditions vary greatly.
Permalink NPR 
July 14th, 2017 9:01am

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