Give ne back my hat!

Today's Tour

https://lottifuehrscheim.wordpress.com/2017/05/17/osdijk/

Going South along the West flank of the Hondsrug (the long thin sand ridge, on the end of which the city of Groningen is located).

Saw my grand daughter there preparing for some horse riding.

Then crossed over to the East flank into the lowland of the river Hunze, crossed it with a little ferry, then back through the wetlands.
Permalink Lotti Fuehrscheim 
May 17th, 2017 11:46am
Thanks. I enjoy it. It is relaxing to see your pictures.
Permalink WorldRover 
May 17th, 2017 11:51am
I bookmarked your page! Appreciate the work to put pictures up there for CoTers to enjoy.
Permalink WorldRover 
May 17th, 2017 11:53am
Nice pics. I don't know if you're willing to be bothered, but you could make them a bit better if you spent some time post-processing them. A sample: https://postimg.org/image/s5zsje82h/
Permalink Yoda 
May 17th, 2017 1:32pm
Yes. I tend to do little post-processing, although I take raw pictures, so I have to 'develop' them.

I put the horizon straight, when shadows are too dark I fill in a bit in the lows, and sometimes I cut away an uninteresting foreground.

But generally I take them as they come.

The Wordpress upload compresses them a lot.

They are published much larger on my website (rerouted to my home PC).

http://82.73.230.254/kraai/foto/2017/2017-05-17%20Osdijk/DSC_1845.jpg
http://springelkamp.nl/kraai/foto/2017/2017-05-17%20Osdijk/

I see you put in a bit more sunny-yellow, and toned down the sky to show the clouds a bit better. That looks good. Also a tiny bit of sharpening?
Permalink Lotti Fuehrscheim 
May 17th, 2017 2:19pm
Nice, is this out on your e-bike?
Permalink libtard_uk 
May 17th, 2017 4:35pm
"Also a tiny bit of sharpening?"

Yes, and bumped up the shadows a bit to get more detail out.
Permalink Yoda 
May 17th, 2017 5:44pm
Nice, thanks Lotti.

Are those hops in the field or something else?
Permalink Trog 
May 18th, 2017 2:31am
> is this out on your e-bike?

Yes, he features in several of the photo's.

http://82.73.230.254/kraai/foto/2017/2017-05-17%20Osdijk/DSC_1864.jpg

> Are those hops in the field or something else?

No, they are tree saplings (chestnut?).

And on the other side of the road the only, tiny, vineyard in the province.
Permalink Lotti Fuehrscheim 
May 18th, 2017 3:34am
There is no longer serious hop production here.

From the Late Middle Ages through the Early Modern Times, when Groningen was a big beer producer, a nearby village specialized in hop production.

There are still some field names testifying.
Permalink Lotti Fuehrscheim 
May 18th, 2017 3:57am
>>>> is this out on your e-bike?
>> Yes, he features in several of the photo's.

Is "bike" of masculine genre in Dutch? Coze in Romanian it's feminine ("o bicicletă, două biciclete") compared to masculine declination ("un biciclet", "doi bicicleți"). Seems weird to refer to a bike in masculine but hey...
Permalink Io 
May 18th, 2017 4:46am
I can see your bootprints in the track. Size 12 boots, 6' 2", 90kg ;)
Permalink , Cup 
May 18th, 2017 4:47am
> Is "bike" of masculine genre in Dutch?

Northern Dutch (similar to Northern German dialect) doesn't have a grammatical feeling for masculine and feminine words. We do have a sense of neutral 'het' (the) and non-neutral 'de' (the), and objects that are not grammatically neutral default to 'hij' (he), not 'zij' (she).

We have two words for bicycle: 'de fiets' and 'het rijwiel'.

South of the river Rhine the situation is different: especially Flemish speakers have a good feeling for male and female words, probably through their proximity to France. Sometimes their Dutch words have taken the French genus, not the German.

For me personally there are male bicycles for men and female bicycles for women :-)

But I should have used 'it' in English, not 'he'. That's my Denglish influence.
Permalink Lotti Fuehrscheim 
May 18th, 2017 5:36am
>> But I should have used 'it' in English, not 'he'. That's my Denglish influence.

That would have been the rigorous way but I thought you wanna underline the feeling that bike is masculine (say as in German Vaterland compared to Russian Motherland).

>> For me personally there are male bicycles for men and female bicycles for women :-)

Weird (from a French perspective :)
Permalink Io 
May 18th, 2017 5:55am
By the way, it is not the object that is male or female, but the word.

In French it is 'la bicyclette' and 'le vélo', same object, different genus.
Permalink Lotti Fuehrscheim 
May 18th, 2017 6:16am
Hmm...
Permalink Io 
May 18th, 2017 6:34am
Being an English speaker, I've never come to grips with the concept of gendered nouns. I learn the genders by rote when I learn the language but they make no sense to me.
Permalink , Cup 
May 18th, 2017 7:11am
English nouns *are* gendered.
Permalink Yoda 
May 18th, 2017 7:14am
The only example I can think of is blond vs. blonde

Others?
Permalink Sangamon 
May 18th, 2017 7:16am
ship
Permalink Yoda 
May 18th, 2017 7:19am
Ship is a very rare example and not often referenced.

Any more?
Permalink Sangamon 
May 18th, 2017 7:24am
No, it's not very rarely referenced. Unless you live in a desert.
Permalink Yoda 
May 18th, 2017 7:26am
"The word 'the' starts looking like the most beautiful, efficient word ever conceived once you start learning a new language—particularly German. The vast majority of languages associate a gender to their nouns. German takes it to a whole new level of complexity. You’ve got the masculine der, the feminine die, the neutral das and the plural die. But, BUT, these articles change depending on the context of their use to sometimes become dem or den or des."
Permalink Io 
May 18th, 2017 7:44am
> English nouns *are* gendered.

Only in a reconstructed academic sense.

The core grammatical roots of English are Northern German (together with Frisian and Saxon), and those languages dropped the gender for nouns very long ago.

Flemish and formal Dutch are Frankish. The Dutch language 'returned' from the South into Frisian (West and North) and Saxon (Eastern) regions), and Frankish, which extends into the Rhineland, has retained genders, but it didn't catch in the shifted regions.
Permalink Lotti Fuehrscheim 
May 18th, 2017 7:51am
Fiancé/Fiancée

Actor/Actress

But calling a ship or an engine "she" is an affectation.

Almost as bad as the New Yorker spelling cooperate with an umlaut.
Permalink Shylock 
May 18th, 2017 7:55am
In school, when we're not sure weather it's masculine or feminine, we're told to count. Since
- a man: un uomo
- a woman: una donna

If it's "una bicicletta" then it's feminine. With French and Italian it's pretty natural but with German it's rote learning :P
Permalink Io 
May 18th, 2017 8:01am
"But calling a ship or an engine "she" is an affectation."

No, it's King's English.
Permalink Yoda 
May 18th, 2017 8:11am
> Since
> - a man: un uomo
> - a woman: una donna

You have learnt that since your birth.

Your teacher effectively told you:

Just see for yourself how you apply the rule, that shows you the rule.

You know the rule, without realizing.

Same way I know whether a word is neutral (het) or not (de).

Grammatical rules are like genes: they permanently reproduce by being used, so being heard by children, so being learned and being used by the next generation.

No teachers needed. Language is its own teacher.

Someone has described it as a parasite. A good parasite brings advantages to its host, so does language.

But sometimes the parasite kills the host, and religion is that kind of risk from the parasite that is language.
Permalink Lotti Fuehrscheim 
May 18th, 2017 8:13am
> "But calling a ship or an engine "she" is an affectation."
>
> No, it's King's English.

You are both saying the same thing.
Permalink Lotti Fuehrscheim 
May 18th, 2017 8:14am
No, speaking proper English is not an "affectation". It's education.
Permalink Yoda 
May 18th, 2017 8:20am
> No, speaking proper English is not an "affectation". It's education.

You can't see the link between affectation and the British education?
Permalink Lotti Fuehrscheim 
May 18th, 2017 8:23am
No, why?

Ah Lotti, still bitter about the lost wars in the XVIIIth century?
Permalink Yoda 
May 18th, 2017 8:28am
> still bitter about the lost wars in the XVIIIth century?

No, I was never such a fan of the power politics of the Republic, or rather Holland.

For the Dutch historical canon, taught in schools, the Netherlands starts with the Dutch revolt under Orange in the late XVIth, has its Golden Age in the XVIIth, and its decline in the XVIIIth century; Disappears during the Revolution, and is reinstated as a Kingdom under Orange after the Battle of Waterloo.

The country I associate with is a union of local Saxons and Frisians, conquered by the Franks in 772, administered by Normans in the 9th century, by the Bishopric of Utrecht in the 10th/11th, de facto independent from the 13th to 15th century, absorbed into Saxony, East Frisia, Gelre and Burgundy in the 16th century of war ending up conquered by the Republic.

For me The Hague is just one of the many governments that have ruled this land, and currently that government is shifting towards Brussels, where it was between 1537 and 1594 already.
Permalink Lotti Fuehrscheim 
May 18th, 2017 8:46am
I don't get it how the capital is Amsterdam but the government actually resides in Hague.
Permalink Io 
May 18th, 2017 8:57am
> I don't get it how the capital is Amsterdam but the government actually resides in Hague.

The Hague, Den Haag, 's-Gravenhage, is 'The Count's Court'.

It started as a castle of the Count of Holland in the 13th century, and became the location of the Assembly of the Estates in the 15th century, and of the General Assembly of the Dutch Republic in the 16th century, and it is still the seat of government.

During the Napoleonic times, King Louis Napoleon resided in Amsterdam, and declared it the capital of the Kingdom Holland, taking the majestic city hall as his palace.

When King William I of Orange took the throne, he liked that palace and kept Amsterdam as capital, although the government has never left The Hague.
Permalink Lotti Fuehrscheim 
May 18th, 2017 9:14am
I wasn't talking about actor vs actress. I was talking about how English has "the" river and "the" road rather than "der" river and "die" road, and "a" river and "a" road rather than "ein" river and "eine" road. I've never understood why any language thought it was necessary or useful to make such a distinction.
Permalink , Cup 
May 18th, 2017 4:00pm
That's due to growing up in English.

English is crying out for other things that other languages have, like a plural you (you all) and a distinction between an inclusive we and an exclusive we.
Permalink Shylock 
May 18th, 2017 6:17pm
After all this time without these, I don't think "crying out" is the right term.  Can "meh" be a verb?
Permalink SaveTheHubble 
May 19th, 2017 8:13am

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