Give ne back my hat!

SpaceX launch today @ 23:21 UDT

Note that due to the high weight of the payload, no recovery of the first stage will be attempted.
Permalink Go Musk 
May 15th, 2017 5:50am
Interesting that recovery is only possible on toy flights.
Permalink Pestular Croaker 
May 15th, 2017 9:24am
Idiot.  Recovery requires FLYING BACK the first-stage to its landing field, or at the very least having a controlled deceleration and landing on a pad in the ocean.

This requires holding back enough fuel to accomplish this.

So you have a choice -- launch light enough or low enough to be able to keep this reserve fuel, or go-for-broke in a heavy vehicle and/or high orbit launch and just lose the first stage.

None of them are "toy" launches.  Some are launches to the Space Station, and they recover THOSE boosters.  And in the history of the United Launch Alliance (ULA) they've NEVER recovered a booster no matter how light the vehicle or low the satellite.

So, you know, have some respect.
Permalink SaveTheHubble 
May 15th, 2017 9:32am
Hubble, I can't believe you let Idiot troll you like that.

(Except I nearly bit as well!).

The demo of the Falcon Heavy later this year with the simultaneous recovery of all 3 stages will be a wonder to behold!
Permalink Go Musk 
May 15th, 2017 9:36am
But Idiot has a point nevertheless. The SpaceX claimed they will launch all these satellites AND recover the boosters. Now it turns out it's OR. A bit of a difference.
Permalink Yoda 
May 15th, 2017 9:36am
Yeah you can recover the booster if there's no payload to speak of, or if it just goes to piddle around in LEO.
Permalink Pestular Croaker 
May 15th, 2017 10:31am
It's the typical Musk bait and switch he's famous for.

Musk: "We save you big money by recovering your booster!"

Customer: "Great I'd like to sign up for that please."

Musk: "Whoa now, hold your horses partner, that ain't going to work for the launch you got in mind. Price just went up!"

Musk: "Our solar roof will cost less than a normal roof and you get the solar for free!"

Customer: "Great I'd like to sign up for that please."

Musk: "Whoa now, hold your horses partner, that ain't going to work for the roof you got in mind. Price just went up!"
Permalink Pestular Croaker 
May 15th, 2017 10:34am
Regardless of recovery, Spacex is 1/3 the price of the competition at around $60m per launch.

With recovery and reuse the price is likely to drop to $40m per launch.

In addition, recovering the nosecone fairing is another $6m.

To say recovery only occurs for LEO launches is incorrect, with LEO the first stage can return to the launch site, with SEO the stage has to land on a barge out in the Atlantic.

Long term, Musk is aiming at 1/300 the price of the competition.

As a reality check, the fuel for a launch costs around $200k.
Permalink Go Musk 
May 15th, 2017 12:15pm
Space shouldn't be cheap.

Everything that gets cheap becomes a mess of pollution and waste.
Permalink Lotti Fuehrscheim 
May 15th, 2017 1:01pm
That's a pretty stupid argument.
Permalink Go Musk 
May 15th, 2017 1:02pm
> That's a pretty stupid argument.

It's not an argument, it's an observation.
Permalink Lotti Fuehrscheim 
May 15th, 2017 1:49pm
"That's a pretty stupid argument."

That's actually a pretty wise argument.
Permalink Yoda 
May 15th, 2017 2:08pm
Right, so you should also be against containerised transport.

What a jerk.
Permalink Sangamon 
May 15th, 2017 2:18pm
Containerised transport destroyed US industry.
Permalink Lotti Fuehrscheim 
May 15th, 2017 2:25pm
Maybe so, but that's a different argument.
Permalink Sangamon 
May 15th, 2017 2:32pm
Live stream:

https://youtu.be/ynMYE64IEKs
Permalink Go Musk 
May 15th, 2017 4:59pm
A live stream that is live now:

https://youtu.be/Cgpaydoo0rw
Permalink Go Musk 
May 15th, 2017 5:21pm
Success:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-39929168
Permalink Go Musk 
May 16th, 2017 12:43am
Wow.  6 tons to Geo-sync.  Impressive.
Permalink SaveTheHubble 
May 16th, 2017 8:52am

This topic is archived. No further replies will be accepted.

Other topics: May, 2017 Other topics: May, 2017 Recent topics Recent topics