I keep hearing about this Geocities thing. Maybe some day I will try it.

Note the title

Absolutely accurate.
Permalink Shylock 
March 17th, 2017 6:55am
It is hard to call Merkel a 'leader'.

Maybe she is a 'head', but she doesn't 'lead'.

Or rather, she leads from behind.

She has always been silent at the start of discussions and issues, lets other people fight and waste arguments and accusations, and in the end she chooses a position after the matter has stalled.

She originally rose to power after inter party fighting resulted in a deadlock, and she was a candidate that had not irreversibly alienated anybody.

I am not saying this is a bad style to rule in principle, but 'leader' is not exactly the most obvious word.
Permalink Lotti Fuehrscheim 
March 17th, 2017 7:03am
Would "Fuehrer" be a better word? ;-)
Permalink Grumpy Old Man 
March 17th, 2017 7:22am
"Fuehrer" is literally "Leader"

'Fuehr' -> for/fore/before > at the front
Permalink Lotti Fuehrscheim 
March 17th, 2017 8:02am
Has the word developed a taint in German at all? It certainly has in English.
Permalink Shylock 
March 17th, 2017 8:09am
> Has the word developed a taint in German at all?

Of course.

But the verb 'fuehren' is a perfectly normal word in German that just means 'to lead', and that is commonly used without any extra thoughts, and in that context the corresponding noun 'Fuehrer' can be used naturally without connotation.

Only in the explicitly political meaning it is avoided.

The common way to write it in German is "Führer" and "Führen". The 'ue' is a second choice when only primitive character sets are available.
Permalink Lotti Fuehrscheim 
March 17th, 2017 8:23am
Ja, ich weiß. Ich kann etwas deutsch sprechen. Aber, nicht genug (:=).
Permalink Shylock 
March 17th, 2017 8:30am
For instance, the team captain of a football team is a "Führer" or "Spielfüher" (game leader).

The leading club in the competition is the "Führer" of the competition. In these contexts the word is not tainted at all.

The word "führen" also doubles as "driving", originally of a draft animal, now of a car.

So a car driver is the "Wagenführer", a driving license is a "Führerschein".

In Dutch we had the same coupling:

'To lead' is (apart from the word 'leiden' that also exists) 'aanvoeren', and a cartman is a 'voerman' in Dutch.

In English one can look for words related to 'further' I think to find this root in your language.
Permalink Lotti Fuehrscheim 
March 17th, 2017 8:33am
When I am writing English, I almost feel like I am writing Latin on a Germanic substrate, especially when the sentences become more rational.

All those fine German roots have been replaced with the Latin vocabulary.
Permalink Lotti Fuehrscheim 
March 17th, 2017 8:38am
When I am writing English, I almost feel like I am writing /Latin/ on a /Germanic/ /substrate/, /especially/ when the /sentences/ become more /rational/.

All those fine /German/ roots have been /replaced/ with the /Latin/ /vocabulary/.

------------

When I am writing *Nederlands*, I am feeling much less that I am writing /Latin/ on a *Duitse* *ondergrond*, *in het bijzonder* wanneer een *zin* meer *redenerend* wordt.

All those fine *Duitse* roots are not *vervangen* by the Latin *woordenschat*.
Permalink Lotti Fuehrscheim 
March 17th, 2017 8:44am
Ja, Engels is een straathond...
Permalink Shylock 
March 17th, 2017 8:57am
That was one thing I really enjoyed about being in Europe (and Israel, for that matter). I love to speak other languages, even if I'm not that good at them. In the US, really, the only other language is Spanish. Nothing wrong with Spanish, but that's it.
Permalink Shylock 
March 17th, 2017 8:59am
In Dutch 'to drive a car' is 'een auto besturen', related to 'to steer', and a car driver is a 'autobestuurder' (or automobilist, which comes from the Italian).

On the other hand 'besturen' is also 'to administrate', and political administrators are 'bestuurders', and administration is 'bestuur'.

Personally I find it fascinating how different groups of meanings have clustered around different words in different configurations in different languages, but that also means that the thought structure of people with different languages is different, as their associations are different.
Permalink Lotti Fuehrscheim 
March 17th, 2017 9:09am
At best Merkel is the leader of a suicide cult thrashing about in the last throes of european culture before it slips below the waters.
Permalink Pegular Roaster 
March 17th, 2017 9:16am
You're boring. Change the spiel.
Permalink Grumpy Old Man 
March 17th, 2017 9:54am
>Personally I find it fascinating how different groups of meanings have clustered around different words in different configurations in different languages, but that also means that the thought structure of people with different languages is different, as their associations are different.

Me too. Lately the mother-in-law's been living with us, I've been trying my hand at Korean. Talk about your different thought structures!
Permalink Shylock 
March 17th, 2017 11:12am
And yet there are some people that argue that there is a linguistic common root of Korean and Indo-European, through Finno-Ugric in the late neolithic age and Siberian languages in the late palaeolithic.

A closer linguistic link than between Indo-European and Semitic languages.
Permalink Lotti Fuehrscheim 
March 17th, 2017 11:18am
Maybe in some of the grammar, but culturally, it's so, so different that western languages. So much emphasis, for example, is placed the age difference between speaker and listener, things I never would have thought important.
Permalink Shylock 
March 17th, 2017 11:59am
Well, yes, but the spiritual world of a late palaeolithic human was completely different from that of us today, and the common root dates from that time.

So whatever common root there is, it has been buried very deep into the language, and will only maybe appear is some tiny grammatical constructs, and not in the vocabulary, which develops at the same speed as technology and culture.
Permalink Lotti Fuehrscheim 
March 17th, 2017 12:06pm
The basic grammatical constructs are much more conservative, but they also have undergone very large transformations over the millennia.

And into very different directions in geographically isolated areas.

Human language needs a number of 'dimensions' (active/passive, number, appearance, speed, time, succession) of expressing differences, but the nature of these 'dimensions' is not essential: it is mutual understanding and convention that builds common meme's out of rather arbitrary elements.
Permalink Lotti Fuehrscheim 
March 17th, 2017 12:13pm
English and Dutch have their common root in the Early Middle Ages, and so are similar on the technological and cultural format of that time.

We can still somewhat associate with the mental world of that time, as a very distorted version of modern Hollywood films proves.

And beyond that time both communities have had rather intensive synchronising events to keep the though structure - which in my opinion practically _is_ language somewhat similar.

Even Korean and Dutch have had synchronisation influences, through technological exchanges and world political power struggle.

The Mongols have tried to invade both Korea and Europe, so we have had a direct identical enemy, without even being aware of each other's existence.

Semitic and Indo-European languages may have had a much older common root.

I think that there was a single migration out of Africa that has dominated the rest of the world, very much reducing all the previous native human populations to marginal remnants.

And that particular migration must have had a common language.

Who knows, what linguistic elements from Neanderthals or Denisova people succeeded in infiltrating the descendants of that language?
Permalink Lotti Fuehrscheim 
March 17th, 2017 12:40pm
"Absolutely accurate." - Shylock

LOL. OK.
Permalink Pegular Roaster 
March 17th, 2017 6:08pm
You think Trump is the leader of the Free World?
Permalink Shylock 
March 17th, 2017 6:15pm
"Talk about your different thought structures!"

낙지볶음 을 좋아하니?
Permalink Pegular Roaster 
March 17th, 2017 6:21pm
יד  וַיֵּלֶךְ, וַיִּקַּח, וַיָּבֵא, לְאִמּוֹ; וַתַּעַשׂ אִמּוֹ מַטְעַמִּים, כַּאֲשֶׁר אָהֵב אָבִיו.
טו  וַתִּקַּח רִבְקָה אֶת-בִּגְדֵי עֵשָׂו בְּנָהּ הַגָּדֹל, הַחֲמֻדֹת, אֲשֶׁר אִתָּהּ, בַּבָּיִת; וַתַּלְבֵּשׁ אֶת-יַעֲקֹב, בְּנָהּ הַקָּטָן.
טז  וְאֵת, עֹרֹת גְּדָיֵי הָעִזִּים, הִלְבִּישָׁה, עַל-יָדָיו--וְעַל, חֶלְקַת צַוָּארָיו.
יז  וַתִּתֵּן אֶת-הַמַּטְעַמִּים וְאֶת-הַלֶּחֶם, אֲשֶׁר עָשָׂתָה, בְּיַד, יַעֲקֹב בְּנָהּ.
יח  וַיָּבֹא אֶל-אָבִיו, וַיֹּאמֶר אָבִי; וַיֹּאמֶר הִנֶּנִּי, מִי אַתָּה בְּנִי.
יט  וַיֹּאמֶר יַעֲקֹב אֶל-אָבִיו, אָנֹכִי עֵשָׂו בְּכֹרֶךָ--עָשִׂיתִי, כַּאֲשֶׁר דִּבַּרְתָּ אֵלָי; קוּם-נָא שְׁבָה, וְאָכְלָה מִצֵּידִי--בַּעֲבוּר, תְּבָרְכַנִּי נַפְשֶׁךָ.
כ  וַיֹּאמֶר יִצְחָק אֶל-בְּנוֹ, מַה-זֶּה מִהַרְתָּ לִמְצֹא בְּנִי; וַיֹּאמֶר, כִּי הִקְרָה יְהוָה אֱלֹהֶיךָ לְפָנָי.
כא  וַיֹּאמֶר יִצְחָק אֶל-יַעֲקֹב, גְּשָׁה-נָּא וַאֲמֻשְׁךָ בְּנִי:  הַאַתָּה זֶה בְּנִי עֵשָׂו, אִם-לֹא.
כב  וַיִּגַּשׁ יַעֲקֹב אֶל-יִצְחָק אָבִיו, וַיְמֻשֵּׁהוּ; וַיֹּאמֶר, הַקֹּל קוֹל יַעֲקֹב, וְהַיָּדַיִם, יְדֵי עֵשָׂו.
כג  וְלֹא הִכִּירוֹ--כִּי-הָיוּ יָדָיו כִּידֵי עֵשָׂו אָחִיו, שְׂעִרֹת; וַיְבָרְכֵהוּ.
כד  וַיֹּאמֶר, אַתָּה זֶה בְּנִי עֵשָׂו; וַיֹּאמֶר, אָנִי.
Permalink Rabbi of Truth 
March 17th, 2017 6:32pm
> 낙지볶음 을 좋아하니?

I cannot read that.

That is written language that is not spoken.

And this forum is not able to display it in the correct vertical way.

That is pretty alien for English and Dutch speakers and writers.
Permalink Lotti Fuehrscheim 
March 17th, 2017 6:47pm
So Google translate can read it.

That is a rather banal question.

I don't care much about it. I generally don't order it when it is on the menu.

But that question itself may have been asked a very long time ago already.

I almost think I can ask my cat that question, and he would probably understand it.
Permalink Lotti Fuehrscheim 
March 17th, 2017 6:53pm









아하니
좋아하니
을 좋아하니
음 을 좋아하니
볶음 을 좋아하니
지볶음 을 좋아하니
낙지볶음 을 좋아하니
낙지볶음 을 좋아하니?

------------------

pleasure
G
Roast
Well
of
Good
Ah
Ha
Nee
Ahani
You like it
I like you
I like the sound.
I like to stir
I like to stir fry.
I like fried octopus.
Do you like fried octopus?
Permalink Lotti Fuehrscheim 
March 17th, 2017 7:01pm
Lotti, most Korean is laid out left to right these days.
Permalink Shylock 
March 18th, 2017 9:51pm
Idiot, if you are going to cut and paste from the Bible, take out the line numbers next time.
Permalink Shylock 
March 18th, 2017 9:52pm

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